Juana Tejada arrived in Canada in 2003 to work under the Live-in Caregiver Program (LCP), a program that would allow them to apply later for permanent residence from within Canada. After completing the required two years to be eligible for permanent residence, Juana submitted her application where she was found to be eligible. She was then required to undergo an immigration medical examination to complete the immigration process, where it was discovered that she had terminal cancer.

Together with grassroots orgs Migrante-Canada she fought bravely and won. In the process she changed the laws around the LCP and helped ensure that others wouldn’t have to go through the same.

Unfortunately, her cancer still claimed her on International Women’s Day 2009. She is remembered as a hero. (more…)

Juanas body is welcomed home by family and Migrante International
Juana’s body is welcomed home by family and Migrante International

A ‘Strong Spirit’ Returns Home

by alex felipe, Special to the Star (21 Mar 2009)

MANILA – After six years, Juana Tejada finally made her long-dreamed-of-return to the Philippines yesterday afternoon.

But instead of walking into the arms of her parents, Tejada’s family watched as a forklift delivered her body, in a cardboard box, from a warehouse at the Manila airport. The nanny who became a foreign workers’ advocate died of cancer in Toronto on March 8.

(more…)

Olivia with Juana and her husband Noli.

Yesterday Migrante-Ontario, the Independent Worker’s Association (IWA), and associated groups celebrated Juana Tejada’s successful fight to gain permanent residence status. Juana is the live-in caregiver (LCP) that was denied status twice after she was discovered to have terminal cancer and deemed a burden to the Canadian healthcare system. (more…)

Juana Tejada, the Filipina caregiver with terminal cancer that fought against her deportation and won, is an inspiration to caregivers and the Filipino community at large. Come celebrate her victory with her next Sunday (24 Aug), and join in the new campaign to ensure what happens to her doesn’t happen to anyone else. (more…)

Myk Miranda, Mithi Esguerra, and I were invited to speak on Radio Migrante (105.5FM) yesterday afternoon on the theme of migration and identity. For one hour every Tuesday from 4-5pm, York University Radio with host Marco Luciano of Migrante-Ontario runs this program about the Filipino migrant experience. (more…)

Canada is going to deport a Toronto-based Filipina live in caregiver because she has cancer.

She completed all the requirements of the live-in caregiver program, but when she underwent the manditory health check that comes with applying for permanent residency they discovered she had cancer. This discovery prompted the order for her to leave Canada.

As one Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) officer put it: “While I am sympathetic to your situation, I am not satisfied that these circumstances justify granting an exemption…. In the opinion of a medical officer, this health condition might reasonably be expected to cause excessive demand on health and social services.” In otherwords, her cancer would cost Canadians too much money. (more…)